Homework

16 June 2023

Posted on Friday 16 June 2023 by Mr Roundtree

Key stage 1 homework

This week’s Talk Time has a Reading theme.

I can talk about my favourite class novel so far.

Over the year, we’ve had the opportunity to read and enjoy lots of different types of books. This week, we’d like you to think back and talk about the book/novel you enjoyed reading the most and why.

Below are some of the class novels we have enjoyed so far in Key Stage 1.

Key Stage 2 homework

This week’s Talk Time has a Reading theme.

I can talk about my favourite class novel so far.

Over the year, we’ve had the opportunity to read and enjoy lots of different types of books. This week, we’d like you to think back and talk about the book/novel you enjoyed reading the most and why.

Below are some of the class novels we have enjoyed so far.

Y3/4
Greek Myths by Marcia Williams
The Firework Maker’s Daughter by Phillip Pullman
Leodis Ledes Leeds by Tom Palmer
The Boy at the Back of the Class by Onjali Q Raúf
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Fighting Fantasy by Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson

 Y5/6
Secrets of a Sun King Emma Carroll
The Nowhere Emporium Ross Mackenzie
Letters from a Lighthouse Emma Carroll

09 June 2023

Posted on Friday 09 June 2023 by Mr Roundtree

Vocabulary is the focus of this week’s homework. This is because we’ve just begun a new Design and Technology topic and with it comes new Design and Technology vocabulary.

Here’s a list of key words that are being learnt and applied as part of our learning. Over the half-term, practise using these words with your child.

Years 1 and 2 Design & Technology vocabulary:

  • design process: the steps that need to happen for something to go from an idea to a finished product
  • to plan: to think about and decide how you’re going to do something
  • to evaluate: to decide, after careful consideration, how good or bad something is
  • base: the bottom part of an object; the part on which something rests
  • structure: a combination of materials and/or parts to create a 3d shape
  • stable: something that is unlikely to fall down or collapse
  • freestanding: something that stands up by itself

Years 3 and 4 Design & Technology vocabulary:

  • product: something that is designed and made fu
  • function: the purpose of something
  • design brief: a description of what a new product should do
  • design criteria: the precise features a product must have to be successful
  • annotated sketch: a detailed sketch labelled with notes (eg dimensions, materials) prototype: an early sample or model of a product used to evaluate a design
  • component: a part that combines with other parts to make something (eg a machine or a piece of equipment)
  • exploded diagram: a drawing that shows the individual components or parts of a product and how they fit together
  • mechanism: a number of parts or comp

Years 5 and 6 Design & Technology vocabulary:

  • design criteria: the precise features a product must have in order to be successful
  • innovative: an adjective to describe new or original ideas
  • sustainable material: a material is sustainable if it comes from renewable sources and it does not damage the environment
  • dimension: a measurement of something in a particular direction (eg height, length, width)
  • aesthetic: something about the appearance (eg something can be aesthetically pleasing) computer-aided design (CAD): a way of drawing on a computer to visualise designs and simulating them to see how they work
  • computer-aided design (CAD): a way of drawing on a computer to visualise designs and simulating them to see how they work
  • to reinforce: to strengthen or support

Some of these words have been introduced already but there may be others that are going to be covered in the coming weeks.

12 May 2023

Posted on Friday 12 May 2023 by Mr Roundtree

This week’s Talk Time has a moral question.

Should all adults have the right to vote?

What is voting?

Voting is a process by which a group of people can decide things fairly when they don’t all agree. Voting is an important part of the type of government called democracy. In a democracy, people use voting to choose government leaders. These government leaders represent their local areas and work together to consider and propose new laws. You must be 18 or over to take part in an election.

Can you think of a time when you’ve voted for something? How did you feel when you cast your vote? Was the process fair? For example, each year in school we elect a new Junior Leadership Team. Each class has the opportunity to vote for a representative from their class to be nominated.

Have a conversation with your family and friends at home and think about whether you feel all adults should have the right to vote and why. After your conversation, take some time to reflect on yours and others responses. Is there anything that you would like to know more about?

Additionally, or alternatively, you might like your child to consider our current Christian value…

At St James’ CE Primary School, we learn about Christian values that help us to become well-rounded citizens in society. The values are woven into our everyday school life. Each half term, we have a new Christian value that will be embedded into our collective worship and our reflection areas.

This half term, our Christian Value is peace.

Peace can mean different things to people. It is often thought of as ‘a time where there is no conflict’ or ‘a state of calm and tranquillity’. It is about positive harmony and healthy relationships between people. It involves spiritual as well as material security. Peace is a state of true wholeness, a state of well-being.

This value helps promotes harmony, stability and security within the school and local community.

Help at home.

Try one, or both, of the following activities:

The dove carrying an olive branch is a symbol of peace in Christianity. Is Christianity the only religion to have a symbol of peace? Carry out some research about peace symbols. You might also design your own symbol of peace to reflect who you are.

or

In the Bible, Psalm 46 is a noisy Psalm. It talks about waters roaring and mountains quaking, about wars and desolation. But it ends with God saying, ‘Be still and know that I am God’.

Our world can feel noisy with the sounds of life at the moment. Wherever you are right now, close your eyes and try to sit quietly without moving… for a whole minute if you can. As you sit quietly like this, if you want to, you can say a silent prayer for stillness, for peace in in your life and those you care about.

05 May 2023

Posted on Friday 05 May 2023 by Mr Roundtree

This week’s Talk Time links to the Coronation of King Charles III.

I know some facts about the Coronation of King Charles III

Watch the video about the coronation of King Charles III or read the information below.

The coronation of King Charles III will take place at Westminster Abbey in London on 6 May. His wife Camilla, the Queen Consort, will be crowned Queen Camilla shortly after as part of the same ceremony.

Coronations have taken place at the Abbey since 1066, the first known for sure to have taken place there being that of William the Conqueror. The ceremony is steeped in tradition: King Charles will sit in the coronation chair, which is over 700 years old; the St Edward’s Crown will be placed on his head; he will be anointed with holy oil by the Archbishop of Canterbury; the coronation anthem Zadok the Priest will be sung, just as it has at every coronation since 1727. After the ceremony King Charles and Queen Camilla will return to Buckingham Palace, where crowds will be waiting for them to appear on the royal balcony.

Celebrations will continue across the weekend. On Sunday 7 May there will be a concert at Windsor Castle. Also on Sunday communities are invited to come together to share food and fun as part of the Coronation Big Lunch. Monday 8 May is an additional bank holiday, when everyone is encouraged to help out in their local community as part of the Big Help Out.

After watching the video and/or reading the text can you answer the following questions:

  • When is the coronation happening?
  • How old is the special coronation chair?
  • What is included in the coronation regalia?
  • How much does the St Edward’s Crown weigh?
  • What role does the Archbishop of Canterbury play in the ceremony?

What events are happening across the coronation weekend?

28 April 2023

Posted on Friday 28 April 2023 by Mr Roundtree

KS1 – Year 1 and Year 2

Vocabulary is the focus of this week’s Talk Time.

We’ve just begun a new Science topic and with it comes new Science vocabulary.

This half-term, we’re all biologists, learning specifically about plants. Here’s a list of key words that are being learnt and applied as part of our learning. Over the half-term, practise using these words with your child.

  • seed: the part of a plant which can grow into a new plant
  • bulbs: the round underground part of a plant that contains food for the plant (eg onion bulb, daffodil bulb, tulip bulb)
  • basic needs: the things that a plant needs to live
  • temperature: a measurement of how hot or cold something is
  • growth: an increase in size
  • healthy: feeling well and happy
  • germinate: when a seed begins to grow into a plant
  • seedling: a young plant grown from a seed.

Some of these words have been introduced already this week but there may be others that are going to be covered in the coming weeks.

KS2 – Year 3 and Year 4

Vocabulary is the focus of this week’s Talk Time.

We’ve just begun a new Science topic and with it comes new Science vocabulary.

This half-term, we’re all physicians, learning specifically about forces and magnets. Here’s a list of key words that are being learnt and applied as part of our learning. Over the half-term, practise using these words with your child.

  • force: a push, pull, twist or turn caused when two objects interact with each other
  • contact: touching
  • non-contact: not touching
  • magnet: an object or device that attracts iron or another magnetic material
  • magnetic: attracted to a magnet
  • to attract: to pull towards
  • to repel: to push away
  • pole: area of a magnet where the magnetic force is strongest
  • compass: a device that aids navigation by pointing to Earth’s North and South poles

Some of these words have been introduced already this week but there may be others that are going to be covered in the coming weeks.

KS2 – Year 5 and Year 6

Vocabulary is the focus of this week’s Talk Time.

We’ve just begun a new Science topic and with it comes new Science vocabulary.

This half-term, we’re all biologists, learning specifically about animals, including humans. Here’s a list of key words that are being learnt and applied as part of our learning. Over the half-term, practise using these words with your child.

  • reproduction: the process by which organisms create new versions of themselves (offspring); all living things reproduce
  • fertilization: when an egg and pollen (or sperm) join together
  • gestation: when a baby animal develops inside its mother’s womb
  • pollination: transferring pollen from the male parts of a flower to the female part of a flower so new plants can be made
  • germination: the process by which seeds grow into plants
  • metamorphosis: a dramatic change in the life cycle of an animal in which it ends up looking totally different
  • sperm: male reproductive cells

Some of these words have been introduced already this week but there may be others that are going to be covered in the coming weeks.

21 April 2023

Posted on Friday 21 April 2023 by Mrs Quirk

This week’s Talk Time has a Reading and Oracy theme.

I can read an extract.

Year 1 and 2

Read the following extract using clear pronunciation and expression. You could take turns to read a line or a verse with someone else at home.

An extract from, The Lorax by Dr Seuss

At the far end of town

where the Grickle-grass grows

and the wind smells slow-and-sour when it blows

and no birds ever sing excepting old crows…

is the Street of the Lifted Lorax.

 

And deep in the Grickle-grass, some people say,

if you look deep enough you can still see, today,

where the Loraz once stood

just as long as it could

before somebody lifted the Lorax away.

 

What was the Lorax?

And why was it there?

And why was it lifted and taken somewhere

from the far end of town where the Grickle-grass grows?

The old Once-ler still lives here,

Ask him. He knows.

 

Key Stage 2

Read the following extract using clear pronunciation. As you read the extract aloud, think about the use of your facial expressions and eye contact too. Consider how and why they change throughout the text.

Year 3 and 4

An extract from Loidis, Ledes, Leeds by Tom Palmer

They had been at the Leeds City Museum for over an hour when Nishaa reached the Egyptian mummy in its glass case. She took one look, then turned away.

It was horrible.

Immediately Nishaa felt disappointed in herself. Disappointed because she loved the idea of being able stand next to things that were thousands of years old. Real things from ancient history. How cool was that? She’d read enough books about them to know how amazing these artefacts were.

But there was something about this mummy. Something dry and brown and rotten that made her feel sick at the same time as being fascinated. Too much like a dead body from centuries ago. Which is exactly what it was.

‘Shall we go and stand outside?’ Mo suggested, noticing Nishaa’s reaction.

‘Get some fresh air.’

‘Yeah,’ Nishaa agreed. Mo led the way. Nishaa and Jack followed. Jack was ready to go too.

They’d done the ancient history section – and the history of Leeds section. Both had been okay, but he’d had enough now. Mo took his two friends down a corridor and through some glass doors. Then another corridor, which was different to the others. It had bare walls. No colourful displays. Even so, Mo felt confident that this was the way out.

Until he saw that the way was blocked by a woman wearing an old-fashioned dress, long dark hair tucked neatly beneath a wide-brimmed hat. She was also wearing a purple ribbon across her coat. The corridor felt suddenly cold.

Mo shivered.

‘Hello,’ the woman said, addressing all three of them.

‘Er… hi,’ Mo said.

‘How are you enjoying the museum, children?’

‘Good thanks,’ Nishaa said.

‘Well, it’s not that good,’ Jack contradicted. He felt tired and grumpy now. He just wanted to be on the bus home.

‘Did you enjoy the gallery about Leeds and its history?’ the woman asked.

‘It was okay,’ Mo replied. ‘But we didn’t really stop for too long.’

‘That’s a shame,’ the woman said. ‘Don’t you want to know about the history of your city?’

‘Not really,’ Jack answered.

The woman said nothing. She just looked at the three children, one after the other.

None of them quite understood who she was, until Nishaa had a thought. Something she remembered from a London museum her dad had taken her to in the summer holidays.

Year 5 and 6

An extract from The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort. It had a perfectly round door like a porthole, painted green, with a shiny yellow brass knob in the exact middle. The door opened on to a tube-shaped hall like a tunnel: a very comfortable tunnel without smoke, with panelled walls, and floors tiled and carpeted, provided with polished chairs, and lots and lots of pegs for hats and coats – the hobbit was fond of visitors. The tunnel wound on and on, going fairly but not quite straight into the side of the hill – The Hill, as all the people for many miles round called it – and many little round doors opened out of it, first on one side and then on another. No going upstairs for the hobbit: bedrooms, bathrooms, cellars, pantries (lots of these), wardrobes (he had whole rooms devoted to clothes), kitchens, dining-rooms, all were on the same floor, and indeed on the same passage. The best rooms were all on the left-hand side (going in), for these were the only ones to have windows, deep-set round windows looking over his garden and meadows beyond, sloping down to the river.

This hobbit was a very well-to-do hobbit, and his name was Baggins. The Bagginses had lived in the neighbourhood of The Hill for time out of mind, and people considered them very respectable, not only because most of them were rich, but also because they never had any adventures or did anything unexpected: you could tell what a Baggins would say on any question without the bother of asking him. This is a story of how a Baggins had an adventure, found himself doing and saying things altogether unexpected. He may have lost the neighbours’ respect, but he gained – well, you will see whether he gained anything in the end.

24 March 2023

Posted on Friday 24 March 2023 by Mrs Quirk

Vocabulary is the focus of this week’s homework. This half-term our topic has been Computing. We’ve been using and applying the key vocabulary below in our learning.

Years 1 and 2 Computing vocabulary:

algorithm a sequence of instructions or a set of rules to get something done
program a collection of algorithms
to debug to find and fix errors in algorithms
computer a type of machine that can follow instructions and do useful things
command an instruction that can be used in a program

Years 3 and 4 Computing vocabulary:

input data sent to a computer system from a device (eg keyboard, mouse, microphone)
output data sent out of a computer system via a device (eg monitor, printer, speaker)
program a collection of algorithms
repetition the execution of certain instructions more than once
to sequence to arrange instructions in a particular order
logical reasoning helps us explain why something happens
sprite a 2d character in a computer game
decomposition the process of breaking down a task into smaller, more-manageable parts
digital footprint information about a particular person that exists on the internet as a result of their online activity and is difficult to remove

 Years 5 and 6 Computing vocabulary:

program a collection of algorithms
selection choosing to execute one set of instructions over another
variable something that is stored in a program and can be changed or used (eg a timer, a score, a number of lives left)
logical reasoning helps us explain why something happens
simulation a model of a real-world or imaginary situation
search engine program that searches for and identifies items on the internet using complex algorithms
internet made up of computers which are connected to each other around the world

All of these words have been introduced over the half term. How confident do you feel explaining what they mean? Can you traffic light them into green (very confident), yellow/orange (mostly confident) or red (not confident).

17 March 2023

Posted on Friday 17 March 2023 by Mrs Quirk

This week’s Talk Time links to Science.

What’s growing?

As the season changes from Winter to Spring, you’ll begin to notice changes in gardens, parks, fields and any other green spaces! You may see flowers starting to bloom or new leaves starting to grow on trees. It’s a wonderfully magical time of year. This week, we’d like you to observe the different changes that you spot in your locality.

You could work scientifically by:

  • recording your observations by taking photographs or sketching flowers
  • using books or internet research to identify flowers
  • spotting patterns relating to where particular flowers are growing eg sunny or shady spots
  • identifying if all deciduous trees are sprouting new leaves at the same time

10 March 2023

Posted on Friday 10 March 2023 by Mr Roundtree

This week’s Talk Time poses a moral dilemma and links to internet safety

Is using the internet is bad for your health? 

You could start by listing reasons why you would use the internet (playing games, social media, watching videos). Are your reasons the same as other members of your family?

We suggest approaching this Talk Time with an open mind. You may already have strong views on this but it’s important to consider both sides of an argument before reaching your conclusions.

Check out these R2s to help you with your discussions at home:

  • What are the health benefits of using the internet?
    • Remember that mental health is crucial to being a healthy person.
  • How could using the internet negatively impact on your health?
    • How could this impact on your physical health?
    • Is using the internet always an enjoyable experience?
  • Decide which argument is the
    • This might be the side with the most points to back it up.
    • You might consider some points to be more important than others.
    • You may not agree with people you speak to – that’s okay!

After the discussion with friends and family, what conclusion do you reach? Do others around you agree?

Additionally, or alternatively, you might like your child to consider our current Christian value…

At St James’ CE Primary School, we learn about Christian values that help us to become well-rounded citizens in society. The values are woven into our everyday school life. Each half term, we have a new Christian value that will be embedded into our collective worship and our reflection areas.

This half term, our Christian Value is forgiveness.

Throughout the Bible, God is described as slow to anger, abounding in love and forgiving sin (Numbers 14:18) and Jesus is shown to be uncompromising in his command to forgive. ‘Forgive’, he said, ‘seventy times seven’ (Matthew 18:21), meaning forgive and keep on forgiving without limit.

Sometimes, we accidentally break things that belong to ourselves or others. Sometimes, we use something so much it wears out. Some things that are broken cannot be mended, but it’s often possible to mend things that we’ve broken.

Help at home!

When you fall out with one of your friends, you can’t mend that friendship with a needle and thread, or some Sellotape, or glue or a puncture kit or a sticking plaster. Forgiving people, or yourself, can be hard. Take a moment to think about why it can help to forgive and how you can do it.

Draw around your hand.

  • Think about why it can important to forgive someone and write in on the palm of your hand.
  • On each finger or thumb, write a way we can forgive someone.
  • Colour and decorate your forgiving fingers, if you wish.

03 March 2023

Posted on Friday 03 March 2023 by Mr Roundtree

This week’s Talk Time is linked to our current topic Computing and has a social theme. There are lots of different types of technology that we can see in the world around us. Take a look at the photos below. What can you see? Have you used any of these things before? Have you seen other people using these things? What other types of technology do you use at school or at home?

This week we’d like you to set yourself a challenge and see how long you can go without using technology.

Can you think of some different ways to approach tasks that would usually involve using technology? For example, using the stairs instead of an escalator or lift. Or playing a board game or reading a book instead of playing on your games console, mobile phone or watching television.